Transcription

By evergreen content we mean that which doesn’t go out of date, or at least very very slowly. As opposed to topical content, which might have a life span of a couple of days or couple of months, but sooner or later its relevance is going to expire.

Now of course there’s an important role for topical content – it helps you to maintain relevance and it can help you tap into various trends on social media – but for various reasons I believe that you should focus the vast majority of your efforts on your evergreen content in the early stages of any campaign.

The first reason is that if this content is to be used across email or social media and it’s evergreen in nature, then you’re going to be able to reuse it again in the future, probably multiple times, and therefore you can justify spending so much more time, energy and money in making this page as amazing as possible.

The second thing is that if this evergreen content is to be housed within the website itself, then it’s going to bring in search engine traffic day after day, week after week, month after month. And therefore the first thing I would encourage you to do is map out all the possible landing pages for your site, and I’m not talking about blog posts that bring in obscure, long tail traffic, but those pages that will actually bring in targeted traffic that can actually convert. I would encourage you to create a map with as many of these pages as possible and invest in creating the richest detail on these landing pages, because what that means is that when you then engage in your social media or PR or whatever it is that’s going to increase the authority of the domain in the eyes of the search engines, the value of that is going to be so much greater as you’re casting your keyword net far wider.

So yes, of course topical content has an important role to play, but for the reasons explained just focus your efforts on absolutely nailing your evergreen content. Get those foundations in place first.