Transcription

When new projects launch there tends to be a rush to get content out and ads running. Key decision makers want to see stuff happening. They want to see signs of early progress.

The trouble is that this that activity that they are so keen to see, is there to feed into something else, so if the something else isn’t correctly set up then you’re not going to see the full benefit of the work you produce. Certain things need to exist first. It’s a bit like when you see someone stick spoilers on an old fiat punto. You sort of feel like they’ve missed the point.

The most common examples of this that we see online include:
– A lack of a coherent brand visual identity
– Poorly designed websites that aren’t going to convert
– Weak technical or on-page optimisation that means even as you grow the authority of the domain, the site still won’t bring in targeted traffic
– The lack of a strong email capture as this is often an important secondary objective of a website
– Goal and event tracking that enables you to make sense of what’s happening on the site

Until these foundations in place, forget the content calendars, press releases and media plans, as the return you will get from them will be just a fraction of what it could be.

This is a lot easier said than done as these decision makers by their very nature are highly impatient, they want to see things happening yesterday. All I would suggest to help alleviate this pressure is to try and get a direct response campaign up and running as quickly as possible. That could be Adwords PPC, Facebook direct response, or an offline lead generation campaign, but something that will drive results early so that you can then justify to that decision maker the need for serious investment in the brand, the user experience, and all of the optimisation surrounding the website, so that moving forwards they get the greatest possible return for every pound spent.

See you next time.

Dan