Boss Digital is a leading agency that delivers ambitious brand strategies whilst keeping a constant focus on ROI.

We recognise that while our clients value our creativity, passion and commitment, ultimately they are paying us for one thing – results. That’s why, whether we’re delivering content strategies, social media marketing or SEO, we measure its success the same way our clients will – in pounds and pence.

MARKET RESEARCH

The first step is to perform in depth research into your business, target audience and competitors to develop a complete strategy for your brand and content, along with all paid and organic channels.

BRAND IDENTITY

If required, we will then use our research to propose a complete brand identity, including your brand core, product features, organisational values and visual identity.

TECHNICAL OPTIMISATION

Before starting any content development, it’s essential that the technical foundations are in place, including domain health, site speed and mobile compatibility.

CONTENT STRATEGY

In order to differentiate the brand we need a number of big ideas to spearhead the content activity, driven by influencer engagement. There must also be a clear content framework that defines the subject and format of content within the monthly calendar.

CHANNEL STRATEGY

once the content strategy is defined we need to be clear on the role and objective of each channel, including the search engines, email, blogging and social media sites.

CPA STRATEGY

Alongside the brand strategy there should be a targeted advertising campaign focused on lead generation within an agreed CPA (Cost Per Acquisition). Common channels for a CPA campaign include PPC, remarketing and social direct response.

WEEKLY REPORTING

We believe in rapid iteration and that requires regular analysis and reporting focused on a small number of key performance indicators, with the primary emphasis always on sales.

At Boss Digital we’re seriously good at two things:

  • Generating leads via a range of digital channels, particularly search marketing, email prospecting and social advertising.
  • Developing world class content and influencer strategies.

Since 2010 we’ve been working with ambitious brands to achieve these two goals.

And we have done it, over and over again:

Factors to consider when planning your Digital Marketing Strategy

descriptionBrand Development

We are obsessive about brand. So much so that we’ve built our very own brand strategy dashboard that helps you to capture every component. We break this down into the following 4 areas:

– Your organisation – vision, values, working environment and employee experience.

– Your visual identity – colour palette, logo, typeface, user and product imagery, and other iconography.

– Your product or service – features and benefits, pricing strategy, value proposition and customer journey.

– Your brand personality – tone of voice and brand lexicon.

Depending on where you are in your brand journey, much of this may already exist. For those areas that have not yet been defined or where it’s clear a degree of tightening is required, we can carry out a combination of stakeholder research and brand workshops.

campaignContent Strategy

Once the brand strategy is defined, we then need to determine how that will manifest itself across the company’s content. There are several steps to getting this right:

– Defining the big idea – every marketing endeavour, whether a temporary campaign or long term strategy, needs to be spearheaded by a creative idea that grabs the audience by the retinas and demands their attention. This all ultimately determine the potential of everything else that follows.

– Creating a clear framework – from content pillars to objectives, channels to formatting, and media spend to KPIs, establishing a clear plan from the outset not only maximises the odds that goals will be achieved, but that they will be so on time and within budget.

devicesChannel Strategy

There are two schools of thought on digital channel strategy:

– One says that once brilliant content is created, it deserves to be published and promoted everywhere. After all, countless hours are tied up in the creative process of generating the content, so it makes plain sense to ensure that value is leveraged across every channel possible. Some people refer to this concept as CODE – Create Once Distribute Everywhere.

– The other says that virtually all world class content strategies are ultimately defined by their success on one single channel, so every minute and ad spend directed elsewhere is reducing efficiency and postponing the date at which all your goals are achieved.

The first step is to perform in depth research into your business, target audience and competitors to develop a complete strategy for your brand and content, along with all paid and organic channels.

If required, we will then use our research to propose a complete brand identity, including your brand core, product features, organisational values and visual identity.

Before starting any content development, it’s essential that the technical foundations are in place, including domain health, site speed and mobile compatibility.

In order to differentiate the brand we need a number of big ideas to spearhead the content activity, driven by influencer engagement. There must also be a clear content framework that defines the subject and format of content within the monthly calendar.

once the content strategy is defined we need to be clear on the role and objective of each channel, including the search engines, email, blogging and social media sites.

Alongside the brand strategy there should be a targeted advertising campaign focused on lead generation within an agreed CPA (Cost Per Acquisition). Common channels for a CPA campaign include PPC, remarketing and social direct response.

We believe in rapid iteration and that requires regular analysis and reporting focused on a small number of key performance indicators, with the primary emphasis always on sales.

So which is right?

Well, both. We do advocate a CODE strategy early on, principally because at this stage we’re not necessarily certain where the greatest win will emerge. However, once that becomes clear, it’s absolutely critical that we double down on that channel. The content may still be published elsewhere (why not?) but every penny of ad spend and every ounce of creative horsepower needs to go into driving growth where we can see it emerging fastest among our priority audience. The only exception is when either we have totally distinct (but important) audiences on different channels, or where a channel is only suited to one stage of the user journey (for example, instagram may be fantastic for initial reach and engagement, but the real nurturing and conversion may be achieve via email).

The key channels that are likely to form part of this overall breakdown:

Whether you’re B2B or consumer, the search engines are almost certainly going to form a key part of the user journey. The vast majority of buyers online start the process with a search into Google, so even if the final enquiry is attributed to a different channel, it’s incredibly unlikely that they won’t have used the search engines at some stage of that journey. However, the primary reason why SEO is so highly prioritised by most brands is its compound nature; unlike most channels where you only see a return for as long as the activity is taking place, SEO is principally achieved via one off tasks such as content creation or on-page optimisation, and the return can therefore continue for long after that task has taken place. This means an investment today may continue to yield results in the form of awareness, leads and sales for years to come.

As powerful as SEO may be in the medium to long term, if you need results tomorrow then you probably need to turn your attention to PPC. The advantage here is that the campaign is entirely within your control. If you need to generate more leads, you simply increase your spend. The key of course is to build a financial model that ensures your cost per acquisition (CPA) of leads/sales always remains within a profitable figure. After all, there’s little point scaling an activity that’s losing you money. On the plus side, with all the tracking available via the Google ads platform, you can measure the value of absolutely everything, and make perfectly informed decisions about where to spend your next pound or dollar.

If there is one channel that has consistently performed for just about every market, whether consumer or B2B, and played a key role in every stage of the customer journey, from inspiration and engagement to conversion and retention, that channel would be email. For some brands the emphasis will be on brand awareness and engagement, while for others it may be about prospecting, with email becoming another direct response channel much like Google ads, but whatever the objective, it almost certainly needs to be part of your overall mix. Much like organic search, a lot of the value is connected to its compound nature – with every email you add to your database (in the most GDPR compliant terms, of course) you are further developing an asset that you yourself own. This is perhaps the greatest difference between email and social media channels – you are building on your own land.

While it’s true that more time and money is wasted on social media than any other channel, it does still have a critical role to play in the overall customer journey. After all, while customers may find you via the search engines, you cannot control whether they do so again. And while getting them onto your email list should be your ultimate objective, you have to find them first, and to do so you need to begin on their terms, and in 2021 that almost certainly means via social channels. The key with social therefore is to ensure that while its short term success will likely be measured in vanity terms (likes, shares, etc), its long term success is measured via either its ability to drive new subscribers to your email list, or to put money in your bank. For the latter, a range of direct response campaigns can be leveraged. Much like paid search marketing, the key is to ensure this all operates within a viable cost per acquisition. For example, if you wish to drive leads via LinkedIn, and you know the value of an MQL (marketing qualified lead) is £100, then you need to ensure the campaign only scales within that CPA figure. The moment the CPA exceeds £100, the campaign needs to be capped and the additional budget split into alternative channels (or the creative/messaging improved upon, of course!).